Opening and Construction Starts Planned for 2011

» Streetcar lines dominate the nation’s new transit construction landscape, but this year only light and commuter rail lines will open for service.

Lest one think that investment in transit is a coasts-only phenomenon in the United States, the sheer quantity of spending planned for new public transportation projects across the country in 2011 indicates otherwise.

In almost every major city or metropolitan area in both the U.S. and Canada, major new rail or bus links are being readied for service. Over the course of the next year, five new light rail lines or extensions will open for operations, as will two new commuter rail corridors. Perhaps more significantly, there are a dozen projects that will enter the construction process — including many streetcar projects — in addition to the dozens already underway. In sum, these represent a continent-wide public sector commitment to the extension of transit offerings.

All

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Weekend Links

» This week’s big news. Open thread in the comments.

Follow my Twitter account (@ttpolitic) to get news in real time.

The Transport Politic

New York to study Red Hook streetcars, but what are the city’s goals?
New Heartland Corridor increases freight capacity between East Coast and Chicago
Tampa outlines plan for spending after transit tax referendum
Political will disappearing, New Jersey’s ARC project could be on the way out

Bus Rapid Transit in San Francisco’s East Bay, on Next American City

Look Out? Building a BRT line in California is No Simple Matter
Opposition to a Bus Rapid Transit System is More than Just NIMBYism
Envisioning a Different Kind of Region

California and Its Friends

With the November elections in the U.S. likely to be difficult for generally pro-high-speed rail Democrats, the likelihood of increasing federal funding for the transportation mode over the next few years is depressingly low, putting

Continue reading Weekend Links »

Weekend Links

» This week’s big news. Open thread in the comments.

Follow my Twitter account (@ttpolitic) to get news in real time.

The Transport Politic:

European transport agencies consolidate intercity rail operations in face of competition
Stations picked, huge automated transit project for Paris is closer to realization
Promoting a second stimulus with the goal of actual job creation

Next American City:

Minding the Gaps: Streetcar plans in Detroit and New Orleans (in the magazine)
New Orleans could be up for radical change with the removal of a highway
If transit investment produces jobs, why isn’t there more of it?

Canadians like transit

The Canadian federal government has agreed to commit $265 million to the Waterloo light rail project, which will extend into Kitchener and Cambridge. The local governments involved may not be able to find the rest of the funds to pay for the almost $700 million program.
Elsewhere in Ontario,

Continue reading Weekend Links »

Weekend Links

» This week’s big news. Open thread in the comments.

Follow my Twitter account (@ttpolitic) to get news in real time.

On The Transport Politic:

U.S. Announces $8.5 Billion in Requests for High-Speed Funds; $2.3 Billion Available
Can Bike Sharing Work in Cities With Monofunctional Job Centers?
Chicago’s Parking Fiasco Fails to Stem Calls for Privatization of Infrastructure
Chicago’s Plans for a High-Speed Airport Link Revived Thanks to Investor Interest

A note on the last article: In discussing the matter of access between Chicago’s downtown and its airport, I neglected to mention two important issues about such links that generally apply to places throughout the country. One, that they’re too often proposed as elixirs (even “money-makers”) for struggling transportation agencies and thus that they are sometimes prioritized over more important projects; and two, that the City of Chicago would do well if it truly thought over the value of such

Continue reading Weekend Links »

Weekend Links

» This week’s big news. Open thread in the comments.

Follow my Twitter account (@ttpolitic) to get news in real time.

On The Transport Politic:

Transportation user fee model obsolete, but no solution on the horizon
Jacksonville’s transit future, at least for now, is in bus rapid transit
Dallas compromises, finding funds for some light rail projects
Overselling the benefits of high-speed rail

New Directions for the Old South series on Next American City:

Raleigh’s downtown upgrade pans out
Raleigh’s streetscape renewal, part of an integrated effort to transform downtown
Knoxville’s Market Square shows pedestrian-only spaces can work, too

Politics

Setting a different tone, Ohio Senator George Voinovich (R) calls for an expansion of the federal gas tax for transportation, describes Robert Cruickshank on California High-Speed Rail Blog. Of course, virtually no one else in power

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  • Twitter: @yfreemark
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